Posts Tagged ‘Malcolm X’

Each person who walks through the doors of 211 NW Davis St. and becomes a part of the Street Roots family brings a distinct set of skills, talents, philosophies and gifts.

Ever since Twan arrived, he has found valuable ways to give. Giving, in fact, is his way of life.

“Service is my bottom line,” he said. “What you do for people who are good is what makes you good.”

On any given day, Twan can be found sweeping, mopping, emptying garbage bags, cleaning the bathroom and refilling the sugar and creamers for the Street Roots coffee station. If all the chores are taken, he looks for additional ways to help the office run smoothly. He helps out because he believes Street Roots is inspirational. 

Each person who walks through the doors of 211 NW Davis St. and becomes a part of the Street Roots family brings a distinct set of skills, talents, philosophies and gifts.

Ever since Twan arrived, he has found valuable ways to give. Giving, in fact, is his way of life.

“Service is my bottom line,” he said. “What you do for people who are good is what makes you good.”

On any given day, Twan can be found sweeping, mopping, emptying garbage bags, cleaning the bathroom and refilling the sugar and creamers for the Street Roots coffee station. If all the chores are taken, he looks for additional ways to help the office run smoothly. He helps out because he believes Street Roots is inspirational. 

The essence of the current cultural discourse is that everything we watch is at least latently political. And we, the people, are hungry for political art. This recurring column, The Politics of American Movies, will explore everything from racially progressive Westerns and anti-fascist comedies to documentaries about the working class and popcorn flicks with subversive bite.


On the afternoon of April 29, 1992, at the corner of Florence and Normandie avenues in Los Angeles, a riot was born. You already know the story — we’ve been retelling it a lot, lately. The police beating just outside of Simi Valley, the 81-second Handycam recording taken by a plumber looking on from his Lake View Terrace apartment, the acquittal, the riots, the nearly $1 billion in property damage, the incalculable damage done to the national psyche. It’s a complex, exhausting, dispiriting history.

The daughters of human rights activist Malcolm X are bringing to life an official Malcolm X Legacy clothing line. Qubilah Shabazz, Ilyasah Shabazz, Attallah Shabazz, Malikah Shabazz, Malaak Shabazz and Gamilah Lumumba Shabazz recently partnered with technology company Hingeto to create and develop the clothing line and online store which has already gained the support of Colin Kaepernick.

Reliving The Principles And Beliefs Of Malcolm X

Posted: 16th November 2017 by freedom in North America
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  • 18 Things You Never Knew About ‘Malcolm X’

    Posted: 16th November 2017 by freedom in North America
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    Twenty-five years later, it’s hard to remember what all the shouting was about. Today, Spike Lee‘s “Malcolm X” looks like a standard Hollywood prestige biopic, centered around an Oscar-worthy performance by Denzel Washington.

    But during the time leading up to the movie’s release a quarter-century ago this week (on November 18, 1992), the behind-the-scenes turmoil of the “Malcolm X’ production seemed nearly as dramatic and racially controversial as the Nation of Islam activist‘s real life had been.

    Ilyasah Shabazz on the Legacy of Her Father, Malcolm X

    Posted: 15th November 2017 by freedom in North America
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    Chicago
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    Article source: http://chicagotonight.wttw.com/2017/11/15/ilyasah-shabazz-legacy-her-father-malcolm-x

    Chicago
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    Q & Andy: Spike Lee

    Posted: 14th November 2017 by freedom in North America
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    The basketball-loving, feather-ruffling film auteur has made over 20 explosive movies since the release of his debut feature, the groundbreaking comedy She’s Gotta Have It, in 1986. This month, he’ll debut a Netflix original series based on that very film. But first, the bard of Brooklyn answers some questions from the writings of Warhol.

    ANDY WARHOL: What did you have for breakfast?

    SPIKE LEE: Blueberry pancakes, three scrambled egg whites, avocado, and chicken sausage. I was hungry.

    WARHOL: What was your first job?